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9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller... 
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sage

Joined: Fri Dec 17, 2010 11:50 pm
Posts: 836
Location: southern oregon/norcal
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
I use the rocker tabs to secure the board initially. But then when I flip the board I use strategically places blocks and shims that I hot glue into place. When you finish the woodworking you can then cut those points loose with a pull saw and CAREFULLY pare the leftover shim bit from the deck of the board. I use very little hot glue and what glue is left on the board does pare off cleanly if you don't over glue the shims.


Mon Mar 28, 2016 9:01 am
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beach bum

Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:27 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Vancouver Island BC CANADA
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
Hey Keith,

Thanks for the suggestion! This too looks like it would serve me well. I am hoping that somewhere in Canada sells "Canoe" bits in a 1/4 shaft otherwise I will look to purchase them out of country through sites like WOODCRAFT or AMAZON... I have a few other local options I have yet to try but these bits are not as common as I thought especially in in a 1/4" shaft.


Mon Mar 28, 2016 1:51 pm
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beach bum

Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:27 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Vancouver Island BC CANADA
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
Hey Randy,

I will be employing your tab method for my next build, again makes so much sense!! If I also switched over to thickened epoxy as well I could further reduce clamping pressures and hopefully be more precise. I will think about this some more and look through some of your older builds to get a better feel for it. I see it being a far more precise way of doing things but having a hard time visualizing how to get the clamping power to work with tightbond as it seems it a daily battle to try not to just force the wood into submission... Definitely thinking about switching it up for the next build.

To save posting another post I thought I would provide a quick update. Found a "Canoe" Flute and bead set locally today, milled a bead on to most of what rail strips I had left. They worked out but I will further refine the jig for next time to further reduce wastes. Spent sometime gluing up railstirps and building more pipe clamps. I finished the fir vent support and started thinking about blocking out the fin box(s) in some yellow and red cedar I had in my offcuts (might go for a 2+1 setup for side bites and single) laminated the nose block and roughed in half of a tail block. Its coming together and considering the downtime that can be avoided next time I happy with the progress as I feel that realistically I have only 15 hours into the build itself but closer to 3 weeks of planning, gathering, milling, tooling up, jigging up and those processes continue to evolve.


Tue Mar 29, 2016 1:50 am
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sage
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Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 11:39 pm
Posts: 383
Location: Toronto, Canada
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
Try Busy Bee Machine Tools http://www.busybeetools.com/products/r-bit-flute-cutter-1-1-2in-x-4in-x1-2in.html


Tue Mar 29, 2016 8:29 am
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beach bum

Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:27 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Vancouver Island BC CANADA
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
Hi 2Groggy,

Thanks for the suggestion, I was able to track down a set of bits at Lee Valley tools which is should you have never heard of them I strongly suggest and HWS builder to take a look at their website www.leevalleytools.com to further your want and need lists. They have an amazing assortment of wood working tools among other things and I have been buying tools there for the past decade as there service is equally as impressive. They handle returns like champs even if the tool is heavily used, They have a record of everything you have ever bought so no need to hold onto receipts as they will not quibble whether you bought it there or that is it atypical wear/abuse, should it not work anymore they happily replace it. I can't say enough good things about Lee Valley however for all these good things comes some bad...Although Lee Valley often has the highest quality tools paired with an unmatched selection and service this comes at a bit of a premium. For example I was able to find 1/4" shaft bits ranging from 45-$60 (US +Shipping, duty to get it up here to the great white north) but I was able to find them at Lee Valley for $69, drive across town to pick them up and be back for early afternoon to start milling. (http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=30155&cat=1,33084,46168,69435,46174&ap=1) I was able to get through the rail strips I had milled for my current build as well as the following one in a hour of getting home and won't have to do anymore milling so a few weeks when I start thinking about my 3rd build.


Tue Mar 29, 2016 1:51 pm
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sage
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Joined: Thu Sep 16, 2010 11:39 pm
Posts: 383
Location: Toronto, Canada
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MisoSalty wrote:
> ...but I was able to find them at Lee Valley for $69, drive
> across town to pick them up and be back for early afternoon to start
> milling.
> (http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=30155&cat=1,33084,46168,69435,46174&ap=1)
> ...

I'm glad that you could find bits within driving distance. Eliminating the shipping costs and wait is worth the extra few dollars - plus LVT has top quality tools.


Tue Mar 29, 2016 9:07 pm
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beach bum

Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:27 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Vancouver Island BC CANADA
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
Had a clamp spring loose in the night last night and had a rail lift and set with part of it's bead exposed... I am wondering if I should cut (to a more consistent shaped gap) and wedge fill it now or later? Anyone have any experience with this?

My fear is that the wedge will act as a wedge and continue to separate the two rails apart. I recently saw a post of a repair to a board's deck by employing a similar process (drill hole on either end of the crack, cut a glueing surface into the crack directly, pressure fit wedge and affix with adhesive) but not sure if it would be better to do it now or later. I am stuck between truing up the rail with a moulding plane so that the following rails remain true after ensuring the gap is structural again through the aforementioned drill/cut, glue and wedge method or try to minimize the gap as best as I can, until the rail strips is backed and fixed to the deck so that it would be less likely to expand the rails and or change the shape of the board and then apply the drill/cut, glue and wedge method.

I may have also made a critical error in my haste last night. I was using off cuts of my 7mm decking to rough up a shape for fin box/tail block. I had thought that I had only butt jointed them with a scraping of tight bond so that I could break it down and laminate it under pressure however the way that I lapped the joints and did not clean the seams after laying it up, today it looked like a cedar shingle roof had been glued on the tail of my current build. After trying to carefully separate the newly formed block of cedar unsuccessfully, I decided to commit to it. I decided to perforate the newly formed and joined 12"x12"x1/4-1" T cedar block as much as I could while leaving some meat for the single finbox to be mounted. I will post some pictures of this mutant tomorrow, tentatively I am calling this tail construction method as "Poor man's honeycomb"


Fri Apr 01, 2016 2:52 am
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beach bum

Joined: Thu Feb 18, 2016 1:27 pm
Posts: 15
Location: Vancouver Island BC CANADA
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
Hello Fellow Builders,

So it has been a longtime since I last posted. The build went okay, it is currently fully enclosed, vent in, shaped and sanded awaiting lam coat and fin install. The one aspect that gave me the most trouble was the landings for the top skin. It was nearly impossible to make a consistent joint from top skin to rails over the landing. I wasn't so happy with this so in fact the board has been back burnered temporarily. I took the break to build another 9' board however it was at the request of a good friend of mine who is a big guy who had specific wants/needs. He basically looked at the wing, desected it and essentially made the decision that he needed something with much more volume in the tail and much less in the nose for the driving shoulder to head height surf at one of our local breaks. He is 6'2 and 240 and with a giggle said "I think this board would be great if this was the nose and this was the tail" pointing to the inverse of which on the wing. So I built the anti wing, I reversed the dimensions of the wig to the best of my abilities and cranked out another board to try and get over the hurdles from the first build. I departed from the norm in the ways that I decided instead of planning down the landings at the nose an the tail I will cut them out. This resulted in a partial skin running continuously from nose to tail at full width. Instead of shaving the landing down on the rails I left them full width and scribed the line provided from the top bead of the rails to fit a piece of planking flush with both the rails and the partial top skin through templating it in cardboard ten transferring it to planking before routing a cove in to the planking. I was much more impressed with the results of this method comparably to "carefully but blindly cut access from the top skin to mate up with the curve of rail." I won't be doing that again but lessons learned... I will lam these up, router out the fin boxes and finish flashing in the coming weeks and will update this thread. Thanks for your interest. Unfortunately after having typed up all this, my pictures won't attach from my iPhone which has the pics on it, womp womp.... I will have to resize some iPhone shots later on and post later, sorry all


Tue Jun 14, 2016 9:49 pm
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sage
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Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:47 am
Posts: 42
Location: Vancouver, BC
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Unread post Re: 9' WING: Longtime Listener first time Caller...
The cutters 2groggy recommended from Busy Bee Tools are the cheapest 1/2" shank large cutter diameter bits that I have seen. If your router will hold 1/2" shanks it is best to always buy the larger/stiffer shank.

I currently use these CMT cutters that are excellent but twice the price:

http://amzn.to/1PzR1gH

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www.sliverpaddleboards.com


Sat Jun 18, 2016 2:21 pm
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